My weekly blog
#1
Welcome.  I'm a Palace fan and a blogger.  I write to express my observations on life.  My blog this weekend.

https://myusuf2016.wordpress.com/2019/04...in-london/
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#2
Welcome mate. Do you ever go to Turkey? I need some shampoo bringing back from there.
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#3
(29-04-2019, 10:32 AM)elgin eagle Wrote: Welcome mate.  Do you ever go to Turkey?  I need some shampoo bringing back from there.

I'm in self-imposed exile from shitface Erdogan but it's not easy keeping away.  Shampoo?  Is it the quality or the price...
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#4
(29-04-2019, 19:37 PM)turkish eagle Wrote:
(29-04-2019, 10:32 AM)elgin eagle Wrote: Welcome mate.  Do you ever go to Turkey?  I need some shampoo bringing back from there.

I'm in self-imposed exile from shitface Erdogan but it's not easy keeping away.  Shampoo?  Is it the quality or the price...

https://urun.gittigidiyor.com/kozmetik-k...-422984165

It's this stuff.  You can't get it here.  When I was in Cyprus last week I was going to go over to the North and see if there was any there.  Bring it back in my socks like shampoo semtex.
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#5
The shampoo mule.
Heart it.
Minimum of 25 years if you get caught though. Big Grin
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#6
(29-04-2019, 22:25 PM)Bones14 Wrote: The shampoo mule.
Heart it.
Minimum of 25 years if you get caught though. Big Grin

Big Grin 

At least your hair will smell nice in the showers  Smile
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#7
Wont be mine, it'll be Turkish Eagle.
Comes on here to publicize his blog and ends up being a shampoo runner. You couldn't make it up. Big Grin

25 years and a cellmate that likes the smell of his hair, poor c*nt.
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#8
(29-04-2019, 23:30 PM)Bones14 Wrote: Wont be mine, it'll be Turkish Eagle.
Comes on here to publicize his blog and ends up being a shampoo runner. You couldn't make it up. Big Grin

25 years and a cellmate that likes the smell of his hair, poor berk.

Big Grin 

That'll learn 'im Smile Surely slagging off Erdogan is a bit risky too?  Shampoo or no shampoo.
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#9
Shampoo mule, love it Smile
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#10
I used to get Turks asking me to get stuff over there but I had no idea that shampoo was such a desirable product...

I'm a UK based (and born) fan so I can safely speak my mind about Tayyip Recep.
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#11
(30-04-2019, 18:55 PM)turkish eagle Wrote: I used to get Turks asking me to get stuff over there but I had no idea that shampoo was such a desirable product...

I'm a UK based (and born) fan so I can safely speak my mind about Tayyip Recep.

Take 2 bottles into the shower?  No fucking way Smile

Is he universally hated by turks or do certain groups like him?  To me he always seems to be trying to juggle plates where Russia and America are concerned. Such a strategic place.
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#12
He polarises people, his supporters are mostly to be found in the provinces, amongst the more religious and others neglected by the state over the decades. He is hated by the left, by the middle class urban professionals in the big cities. In hindsight he made the same pitch that Trump made two years ago.
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#13
(30-04-2019, 22:16 PM)turkish eagle Wrote: He polarises people, his supporters are mostly to be found in the provinces, amongst the more religious and others neglected by the state over the decades.  He is hated by the left, by the middle class urban professionals in the big cities.  In hindsight he made the same pitch that Trump made two years ago.

Thanks, interesting.  Why did the coup fail?
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#14
That is a very interesting view Turkish.

I was under the impression his support was so strong that Army refused to shoot them and hence the coup failed.
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#15
Why did the coup fail. Difficult to say for sure. The President blames a former ally, who shared many of his goals but they fell out regarding some corruption scandals. The army, for long the upholder of Ataturk's secular vision, has been weakened by gradually having people more sympathetic to Erdogan put in place. The same with the judiciary. The army had no interest in siding with Erdogan or his opponents. Also, Erdogan escaped and rallied his supporters in the early hours. If he'd been captured it might have emboldened his opponents to come out on the streets. So they mostly stayed at home to watch it on the news. What is definite is that Erdogan used the coup to purge the army, judiciary and all public enemies, whether they had any sympathies with his former ally or not. So the left and liberals, who had nothing to do with it, paid the highest price.

But the tide may be turning, the ruling party lost heavily in Izmir, more narrowly in Ankara and in Istanbul although in the latter case they are trying to claim the result was a consequence of fraud and are demanding a re-vote.

Also if the economy slides his support will be affected. His trade wars with Trump over an American evangelist that was imprisoned revealed his impotence. The sanctions after a Russian plane was shot down close to the Syrian border show how vulnerable the Turkish economy is.
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#16
(01-05-2019, 22:25 PM)Blind_Eagle Wrote:
(29-04-2019, 10:32 AM)elgin eagle Wrote: Welcome mate.  Do you ever go to Turkey?  I need some shampoo bringing back from there.

Big Grin

I like EE, in for a penny in for a pound, I can relate to that lol
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#17
(01-05-2019, 22:23 PM)turkish eagle Wrote: Why did the coup fail. Difficult to say for sure. The President blames a former ally, who shared many of his goals but they fell out regarding some corruption scandals. The army, for long the upholder of Ataturk's secular vision, has been weakened by gradually having people more sympathetic to Erdogan put in place. The same with the judiciary. The army had no interest in siding with Erdogan or his opponents. Also, Erdogan escaped and rallied his supporters in the early hours. If he'd been captured it might have emboldened his opponents to come out on the streets. So they mostly stayed at home to watch it on the news. What is definite is that Erdogan used the coup to purge the army, judiciary and all public enemies, whether they had any sympathies with his former ally or not. So the left and liberals, who had nothing to do with it, paid the highest price.

But the tide may be turning, the ruling party lost heavily in Izmir, more narrowly in Ankara and in Istanbul although in the latter case they are trying to claim the result was a consequence of fraud and are demanding a re-vote.

Also if the economy slides his support will be affected. His trade wars with Trump over an American evangelist that was imprisoned revealed his impotence. The sanctions after a Russian plane was shot down close to the Syrian border show how vulnerable the Turkish economy is.
Very interesting, thanks. As long as the shampoo industry isn't affected then I will support your endeavours. Obviously watching the news here you only see the western interpretation of events which seems to largely depend on which kind of regime the establishment secret service wants to see in power there. We get crap coverage of Syria, for example. What's your take on that place?

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#18
Syria? Well initially in the first flush of the Arab Spring western countries (and Turkey) thought they could help the Syrian opposition to get rid of Assad, just like they did with Gaddafi and Mubarak in Libya and Egypt. They supported the flow of arms, money and turned a blind eye to non-Syrian's arriving to participate in the civil war. At the same time the Iraqi and Lebanese shi-ites and the Iranian's were doing the same to support their interests. The western countries decided to outsource their involvement to mercenaries in other words. Who then became ISIS and other religious grouping. It wasn't their plan but by the time it happened millions (if not billions) had been spent trying to form a Syrian opposition with military strength to match the regime's. There were stories of defecting generals sitting in lavish Istanbul hotels greedily milking the west whilst the opposition were being bombed and starved in Syria itself.

When it looked like Damascus and Assad were in danger the Iranian's warned the Russian's who'd by now decided to support their interests (keeping the regime in power) with air power. Since then the regime has gradually increased its control of the country. The west only became active to fight ISIS. Turkey only became active to prevent a Syrian Kurdish state forming along it's border. So interests of USA and Russia and Turkey have all aligned. Assad remains in power. Half the country is in ruins. A large proportion of it's population is in Lebanon and Turkey, probably unlikely to return. The Kurds will end up getting stiffed by Trump I suspect and forced to hand over their territory to Assad.

Erdogan initially thought he could persuade Assad to democratise his regime. Then in fury at being taken for a fool allowed Turkey's borders to be a funnel for opposition. Then when ISIS formed and started attacking Turkey they tightened the border. Syrian oil was flowing into Turkey and the government has clamped down on journalists who've exposed the links between the ruling party in Turkey and the Syrian oil trade.

The EU bribed Turkey to take back refugees who were crossing into Greece.

It's very murky. I will say this though, the Turkish state has welcomed, fed, housed, educated the Syrian refugees, who are putting down roots in Turkey and likely to assimilate. For all the bollocks about immigration into EU, two countries between them accommodate 5 million refugees, Turkey and Lebanon. Germany allowed a million in. The UK said it would allow 20,000 unaccompanied children and then even that measly total wasn't reached.
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#19
(02-05-2019, 17:42 PM)turkish eagle Wrote: Syria?  Well initially in the first flush of the Arab Spring western countries (and Turkey) thought they could help the Syrian opposition to get rid of Assad, just like they did with Gaddafi and Mubarak in Libya and Egypt.  They supported the flow of arms, money and turned a blind eye to non-Syrian's arriving to participate in the civil war.  At the same time the Iraqi and Lebanese shi-ites and the Iranian's were doing the same to support their interests.  The western countries decided to outsource their involvement to mercenaries in other words.  Who then became ISIS and other religious grouping.  It wasn't their plan but by the time it happened millions (if not billions) had been spent trying to form a Syrian opposition with military strength to match the regime's.  There were stories of defecting generals sitting in lavish Istanbul hotels greedily milking the west whilst the opposition were being bombed and starved in Syria itself.

When it looked like Damascus and Assad were in danger the Iranian's warned the Russian's who'd by now decided to support their interests (keeping the regime in power) with air power.  Since then the regime has gradually increased its control of the country.  The west only became active to fight ISIS.  Turkey only became active to prevent a Syrian Kurdish state forming along it's border.  So interests of USA and Russia and Turkey have all aligned.  Assad remains in power.  Half the country is in ruins.  A large proportion of it's population is in Lebanon and Turkey, probably unlikely to return.  The Kurds will end up getting stiffed by Trump I suspect and forced to hand over their territory to Assad.  

Erdogan initially thought he could persuade Assad to democratise his regime.  Then in fury at being taken for a fool allowed Turkey's borders to be a funnel for opposition.  Then when ISIS formed and started attacking Turkey they tightened the border.  Syrian oil was flowing into Turkey and the government has clamped down on journalists who've exposed the links between the ruling party in Turkey and the Syrian oil trade.  

The EU bribed Turkey to take back refugees who were crossing into Greece.

It's very murky.  I will say this though, the Turkish state has welcomed, fed, housed, educated the Syrian refugees, who are putting down roots in Turkey and likely to assimilate.  For all the bollocks about immigration into EU, two countries between them accommodate 5 million refugees, Turkey and Lebanon.  Germany allowed a million in.  The UK said it would allow 20,000 unaccompanied children and then even that measly total wasn't reached.

That's a great effort by Turkey to be fair isn't it.  5 million versus 20,000.  As you say, it makes a mockery of the xenophobic smear we read about.

Good opinions about the rest as well.  There is a poster on the BBS called Heb 7:4 who would prefer to blame Russia for everything and post sickening images of disfigured children, but he's a c*nt and fortunately not on our new site.  In my opinion it's such a mess in Syria largely because of the west trying to effect regime change and will probably remain so for years thanks to their refusal to back down.  Of course they all must take a share of the blame, including Turkey.  Again of course, the black gold will always be a factor.  

Bit off topic and taking it back to shampoo issues for a minute, when I was researching hair transplant ops I discovered you could get one done in Damascus for under a grand.  I even emailed the bloke but it transpired he had moved to Turkey as well.
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#20
There is a movie called "Brothers in Arms' (Turkish) very good if anyone wants to watch


Cheers Turkish, that is a very good account and good to know
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