Gardening Thread
#1
You know you are officially getting old when you start a gardening thread.  I know bugger all about gardening, my question is, can I plant a privet hedge over the site of a former stone wall?  It has some gaps in it where roots could go down into it I think.

   
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#2
   
The Lady Garden Foundation eh...
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#3
Are you talking about along the edge of the drive from the exposed bricks?

I would say there is not a lot of room there and planting would be impossible as under the previous brick work would have been footings...…...If it had been done properly!

How about a picket fence?  Go full on old boy. 

You would need to hire a kanga gun to make holes for the fence posts to support it. That exposed brick work also needs cementing in places by the looks of it and rendered.

The order I would do it.

Make good brick work
Render
Get fencing and work out hole requirements.
Dig fence post holes
Install Posts
Install panels.
Put on slippers and sit in arm chair stroking cat......
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#4
(24-09-2019, 23:39 PM)The Groover Wrote: Are you talking about along the edge of the drive from the exposed bricks?

I would say there is not a lot of room there and planting would be impossible as under the previous brick work would have been footings...…...If it had been done properly!

How about a picket fence?  Go full on old boy. 

You would need to hire a kanga gun to make holes for the fence posts to support it. That exposed brick work also needs cementing in places by the looks of it and rendered.

The order I would do it.

Make good brick work
Render
Get fencing and work out hole requirements.
Dig fence post holes
Install Posts
Install panels.
Put on slippers and sit in arm chair stroking cat......
Cheers mate, when can you start? Smile Previously there was a stone wall running alongside the length of the side of the house, but a bit collapsed and I decided that given the bad condition of the rest of it, rebuilding a stone wall of that length wasn't an option.  It took 8 loads on a trailer to get it all taken away.  Now looking at about 50 quid a metre for a fence, and struggling to find anyone who wants to put it up over the wall, so thinking about other options.  Have found 25 metres of 3ft privet plants for much less, just wondered if I could drive spikes into the cracks of what's left of the double skin wall, then add a load of earth over it and then cable tie the plants to the spikes.  Have got some metal fences there in the meantime.
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#5
Depending on what type of privet you get elgin, you'll need to put them in some decent soil. Most will grow at a fairly rapid rate (3-5foot a year) up to 12-18 feet max especially if they have full sun, or 3/4 sun.
The first year is especially important with privet hedges as you'll be able to control their growth and train how they grow according to your space by pruning/trimming.
The root system will grow effectively on what type of soil they're planted in. If its clay past 4 inches then the root system will remain relatively shallow (grow out rather than down), same with unwatered areas, they will remain shallow. If you have decent soil then the core root system will grow anywhere from 15-20 odd inches.

If you need anymore info you can get stuffed as I used to have a gardening business and as you'll be aware, information comes at a cost Big Grin
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#6
Big Grin Cheers Bonesey, I'll take your free advice.  Decent soil you say, gotya.  I guess if the roots will grow everywhere it'll be strong enough won't it.
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#7
Key points.
Full sun, 3/4 sun they'll grow rapidly providing you have good depth of soil.
Full sun, 3/4 sun they'll grow reasonably in average soil.
1/2 sun or below, they may well struggle initially until they acclimatise to the conditions, but then still there's no guarantee that they'll take that well.
Prevailing winds wont help in their infancy if they're in direct line.
Soil is key to any plant, shrub, hedge etc.
If you know how much top soil you have, then you're halfway there to making a good decision on what will survive/flourish.
What plants etc grow well in the vicinity of your house? Are there any privet hedges nearby? Is the drainage of the soil good/poor?
Lots of questions, but the answers are right in front of you, which will ensure the correct decisions can be made.
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#8
3/4 sun, so I'll need a fair bit of soil then.
Will be in a line but fairly protected from the wind.
There is a privet hedge between the houses, so it definitely grows there. Drainage is ok I think.  Cheers.
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#9
Ok.
Give us a yell if you need anymore "advice for a price". Wink
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